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AMD’s Zen 4 Based 5nm Ryzen 5000 Desktop CPUs Allegedly Feature DDR5 Memory And USB 4.0 Support On AM5 Platform In 2022  

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yeehi
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May 7, 2020 07:42  

https://wccftech.com/amd-ryzen-5000-zen-4-am5-desktop-cpus-ddr5-usb-4-support-2022/

 

The roadmap we received, which we are unable to share as it is likely marked to find leakers, indicates that 2022 is the year that AMD is intending to get DDR5 into its premium desktop lineup. The 2022 platform will retain PCIe4 and will likely be a Zen4 product, also intended to feature native USB4 support. The APUs for that year also presently have DDR5 on the roadmap and are listed as Zen3+ parts. The mobile roadmap has DDR5 LP5 on-board for 2022 in the premium and gaming lines. via GamersNexus

 

AM5 in 2023...?

This topic was modified 3 months ago by yeehi

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yeehi
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May 7, 2020 08:08  

Based on the speculation above, I think I might plan on creating a new build in 2023 with the forthcoming AM5 socket and Ryzen 6000. I would probably keep going with that rig and upgrade its CPU in the distant future with the end of the line AM5 socket CPU, which I would purchase second hand. I would keep going with that until, what, the AM8 socket?!

I would be grateful if anybody could provide some tips on this strategy. 

 

What could I do with the Ryzen 6000 when it becomes "old" and I swap it out of the the system?

What would be a smart way of deciding which graphics card to get and when to upgrade them?

I am a bit concerned about the motherboard choice, as it will be the thing that (hopefully) lasts the longest and will hopefully support the functionality of much later hardware.

Does anybody else want to try this strategy too? 


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Olle P
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May 12, 2020 09:43  

I've been doing incremental upgrades to my computer for the last 20 years now. The oldest part still present, the 3.5" FDD, is about 25 years old though.

My primary strategy has been to simply replace parts when they break or I have a need for better performance.
If something is broken I get the "best" replacement readily available ASAP (after defining to myself what "best" means in terms of price/performance/features).
If it's an upgrade for better performance I'm usually planning ahead looking at what will be available within a couple of months or so and then rely on reviews and the like before making an informed decision. I opt to get a bit more performance than required at the time, so I won't have to replace the part too soon.

(The last couple of years this scheme has been thwarted as I've distributed parts of my computer to my two kids when they built their first computers. That meant I got new parts for my computer a bit prematurely.)

I've had my fair share of "wrong bets", like opting for a Socket 939 motherboard just after the release of AM2 and before AMD stopped supporting 939. I also had way too high hopes for Lucid Virtu, making me buy a Z68 motherboard.

The worst part financially was that 939 motherboard which also meant going from AGP to PCIe so I had to replace my graphics card prematurely. Essentially that was a new computer after replacing motherboard, CPU, CPU cooler, RAM and graphics card all at once.

 

So to provide some advice based on my experiences:

Motherboard:
Expect it to be used for one CPU only, unless you enter with a low end CPU to cut the initial cost and get the desired model in less than a year.
The motherboard should provide the I/O and other features you expect to require over the next 4-5 years.

CPU:
Try to aim a bit above your minimum requirements but within reason.
Don't expect to buy second hand later on, as by then you'll most probably better off by getting a new motherboard and new (later model) CPU.

Other parts:
Case, PSU and such can typically be used for much longer. Expect >10 years of lifespan.
Storage drives I replace when I need more space. The older drive is then used to store less sensitive data until I upgrade yet again.
RAM is dictated by compatibility. A couple of times I've used the ability to add more RAM after a few years.

What to do with your old CPU as it's being replaced?
That really depends on several parameters at that time. What's its monetary value? Have you replaced the motherboard (and RAM) as well? Do you need another computer at home? What new CPUs are available?

At the moment I have a fully functional Gigabyte Z270 motherboard with a Core i5-6600K and Cooler Master 212 EVO heatsink gathering dust at home. I've considered using it for a HTPC, but then the other parts required would still make it fairly expensive. My hope was that my daughter would use that CPU and cooler for her computer, now running a Skylake Core i3, but she doesn't dare replacing anything fearing it will break.
I think the parts are pretty worthless from a monetary point of view, given the low cost of comparable performance in new parts.
Previously I've flogged my used parts to a colleague, but now he's got a better rig than this.
I seriously consider just giving it away for free if anybody can make use of it.


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F7GOS
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May 14, 2020 09:01  
Posted by: @olle-p

I've had my fair share of "wrong bets", like opting for a Socket 939 motherboard just after the release of AM2 and before AMD stopped supporting 939. I also had way too high hopes for Lucid Virtu, making me buy a Z68 motherboard.

 

Feel Free to check out the F7GOS youtube channel.
www.youtube.com/c/F7GOS


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F7GOS
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May 14, 2020 09:02  

Think yourself lucky on the 939... I bought 754 🤣 

Feel Free to check out the F7GOS youtube channel.
www.youtube.com/c/F7GOS


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Olle P
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May 19, 2020 01:48  
Posted by: @f7gos

Think yourself lucky on the 939... I bought 754 🤣 

With a Socket 754 mobo you could at least get yourself a newly released CPU years later, although possibly not much of an upgrade unless your first CPU for that board was (also) a Sempron...


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yeehi
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May 22, 2020 14:03  

There will be a premium on price for the first CPU on a new AMD socket, and also a bit of a risk, as nobody will have tested it yet. I wonder if there is also much of a premium on the used prices for the ultimate CPU on a particular socket.

Buy the first new CPU with the next AMD socket, with the intention of getting long life out of the motherboard.

Buy the second CPU used, end of the line for that socket, with all the following benefits:

  • Best CPU for that socket
  • Others have tried and tested it, so you pick one without teething problems
  • Used prices
  • It greatly extends (hopefully) the time until you need to purchase a brand new CPU
  • You might even be able to skip a entire generation of sockets!

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cweed
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May 24, 2020 00:26  

@olle-p A good strategy and similar to what i always wanted to do, but I always end up fully rebuilding every 7 years or so... even when I promise myself 'oh this build I'm keeping for long term and will just replace and upgrade parts' ... i usually end up reselling or gifting my previous rig to a family member or friend and because Intel tends to swap sockets very frequently, it means a mobo and cpu replacement and then I usually end up just doing a new build... 

I'd happily take the z270 and 6600 off your hands 😀


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Olle P
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May 25, 2020 09:05  
Posted by: @yeehi

... I wonder if there is also much of a premium on the used prices for the ultimate CPU on a particular socket. ...

Looking at some Intel samples I'd say second hand prices don't drop until you're not interested in buying it. Look at the Core i7-7700K, which (used) was about $300 just a month ago, more than three years after its launch.


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